Design a site like this with WordPress.com
Get started
  • Final Portfolio

    Final Reflection

    While taking the course Eng 1103, I have learned more about how to write for an audience and have expanded my vocabulary, in addition to learning how to limit my screen time. This course using Dr.Lucas’ unique teaching style has taught me several things that have greatly improved my writing. Writing an online blog on wordpress has helped me write for an audience. Having a clear audience in mind, I felt I was able to better connect with my readers and give more detailed pieces and have more specific examples when writing my articles. I also tried to let the readers know a little about my and my hobbies when we wrote our first piece. Knowing that my writing would be read by someone also helped my quality of writing improve overall. When it comes to expanding my vocabulary wordplay day helped with that. On Wordplay day, every friday, we would play scrabble and compete against each other with teams of two. Collaborating with my teammate helped us both learn new words and win the game. In class we are usually not allowed to use our computers unless we are typing up our essay revisions, or reading and responding to other classmate’s blogs on wordpress. Except for a five minute break we are not allowed to use our phones during class. This helps limit distractions and I find myself not worried about snapchat or instagram notifications, and I can devote all my attention into my writing, and the current task at hand in class. This has helped impact me even when I am not in Dr. Lucas’ class. I am now able to write essays without having to play music in one ear and can now devote all of my attention to doing my homework with zero distractions. Writing for a blog, wordplay day, and limiting screen time have all helped to improve my English and writing skills.

    Another thing we used in class was the textbook, Writing Analytically by David Rosenwasser and Jill Stephen. This resource was very useful because it gave extremely helpful information and tips when writing papers, such as how to integrate quotes, weak thesis statements, and writing on paper vs computers. While reading this textbook, I was able to learn how to identify a weak thesis statement, as well as how to fix it. This skill of being able to identify a weak thesis statement helped me tremendously with the impact and strength of my writing. I am now able to create a thesis statement that accurately captures the meaning of my paper and delivers my main idea. In order to have a strong thesis statement one of the most basic tips is that you should have a strong claim. According to Writing Analytically , if there is no claim, “There is, in short, nothing at stake, no issue to be resolved.”. If there is no claim then “they direct neither the writer nor the reader toward some position or organizational plan.” Reading this textbook has taught me how to write the best thesis statement possible for my essays.

    Work Cited

    Rosenwasser, David and Jill Stephen. “Five Kinds of Weak Thesis Statements.” Writing Analytically, 8th edition. Wadsworth/ Cengage, 2019. Pp.208-12.

    Old Literacy in the New World

    Matt Richtel, writer of the New York Times article “Blogs vs.Term Papers” discusses the debate in the educational world of mid-term papers or blogs. The article begins by stating how stressful writing an academic paper can be for students. Richtel then introduces Cathy N.Davidson, an english professor at Duke, who believes in the positive power of blogs and “new literacy.” Shortly after this Richtel introduces Douglas B.Reeves, Founder of the Leadership and Learning center and a columnist for the American School Board Journal, Reeves believes in the beneficial influence of term papers. Richtel then quotes two more people and their views; William H.Fitzhugh, the study’s author and founder of The Concord Review, lists his view of the issue and a possible solution for this, in addition to Fitzhugh, Andrea A.Lunsford, a professor of English at Stanford then states her point of view that there is no problem to be solved. Richtel closes out the paper with a quote from Professor Davidson that seems to be pro-blog and anti- term paper. Throughout the article Richtel places emphasis on the positives to the new form of literacy and through his increased information and quotations based on this type of literacy, a bias is created against the term paper, and older forms of literacy. 

    “Old literacy”, such as, writing term papers is described to give the writer a “dramatic leg up in the terms of critical thinking, argumentation and the sort of expression required. Not only in college, but in the job market” (Reeves qtd in Richtel) “Blogs vs. Term Papers’ ‘. After Richtel quotes Reeves he then gives the statistic that 82% of first year college students were not asked to write a paper of 20 pages or more, this statistic, which comes from The National Survey of Student Engagement in 2011, reveals the decreasing popularity of the term paper. This statistic is Richtel’s way of saying that it is becoming increasingly uncommon to see students with these ‘critical thinking skills’. Richtel’s quotes reinforces the position of pro-term papers, but also addresses the decreasing popularity of the term paper and the increasing popularity of the blog. Richtel uses quotations to give a solution- Mr.Fitzhugh claims that “the solution [to the decrease in writing of term papers] isn’t blogs, the solution is more reading”. This quote proposes that the problem lies within the school systems and the teachers themselves.

    “New Literacy” which can be classified as powerpoints, blogs, tweets or anything on the internet someone can write. “New Literacy” is what the most recent generations have been raised on. This means that these students are more comfortable writing a blog post or an instagram caption than a research paper. This idea is supported when Richtel mentions that Professor Lunsford believes “students feel much more impassioned by the new literacy”. On these websites and apps instant gratification can be found through the number of likes or comments on the media, which generally encourages the person to post again. Richtel then continues to voice Lunsford’s opinions when he includes that, “They [students] love writing for an audience, engaging with it…..producing something personally rewarding and valuable”. Davidson also believes that this ‘new-age’ form of writing grows passion for literature, and without it many students think that“writing is boring”. 

    Richtel shows his bias towards this new type of writing when he claims that “Professor Lunsford is playing to student passions”. Richtel brings up the phrase “student passions” to tell the audience that blogs are what the students prefer and what they can be passionate about. Richtel argues that students cannot be passionate about a 15 page research paper but can instead take interest and pride in blogs. 

    The utilization of many sources that have similar views on the term-paper shows Richtel’s bias. Richtel uses one source to take the side that term-papers are more beneficial then seems to not quote them for the remainder of the article. On the other hand, Richtel uses three sources supporting the blog as a tool for students. Richtel shows his bias in his article without even outright saying it just based on the amount of quotes he has that favors blogs throughout his writing.

    Ten years after Richtel’s article was published we can see that this is still a debate in the academic world, but we can also see which side seems to be winning. Surprisingly it seems to be a mixture of both, although the assignment of many long papers have ceased to exist, term-papers still do exist but seem to be more smaller-feasible papers. We have also seen the increase in the amount of blogs being made and assigned to students, in fact many students have had an experience of a project that related to writing on a form of social media. 

    Work Cited

    Richtel, Matt. “Blogs vs. Term Papers,” The New York Times, 20 Jan. 2012, https://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/22/education/edlife/muscling-in-on-the-term-paper-tradition.html.

    ENG-1103, A Required Course

    Eng-1103, a required class for all students at High Point University, provides students with a foundation of the fundamentals of college English courses. Many take it solely because they have to, others take it for enjoyment, and their love of writing. Either Way, both types of students can be found in the classroom, and it’s up to the professor to create their experience. In my English Class we are able to play scrabble, craft blogs, and limit our screen time, all allowing us to focus better in class, have fun, and learn new words. These experiences, in addition to my analysis paper, have taught me that writing doesn’t have to be terrible and can be enjoyable.

    In class to help expand and develop our writing skill we use Writing Analytically, a textbook by David Rosenwasser and Jill Stepher. One thing these lessons from Writing Analytically has taught me was in order to include more information in a quotation you can add square brackets for context. An example I can take from the book is “use square brackets to alter or add information within a quotation” (Stephen, Rosenwasser 233) and I can alter it to give more information by saying,”use square brackets [in your quotations] to alter or add information within a quotation.”. My incerpt gave the reader more direction to use for the tip. This trick from the textbook helped me when writing my analytical essay. I was able to give more insight and context to my readers. I was able to learn new tricks in class by using the textbook to help write my analytical essay. 

    The next activity in class we did that I would like to talk about is playing scrabble. To most people playing scrabble during class sounds “too fun” for class or “too easy” but while they were enjoyable, they weren’t always easy. One time I was down to only consonants and was ready to accept defeat, when my professor came over and told me to play an m, which gave me three words, mic, bi, and om, which gave me twenty-six points in one turn. I never would have thought of those words on my own, but I will be using them in future games. Though scrabble seems like some childish game, you can learn a lot of new words, and about the limits of your vocabulary. 

    An additional aspect about Eng-1103 that I enjoyed was the collaboration in almost everything. Classwork was usually done in groups of four, where each member of the group had to give their feedback on the topic. This classwork was usually a small writing prompt where we would read and give our thoughts, we would then work together to combine our thoughts into one main idea. This not only helped everyone participate but it taught us how we should work with others by using everyone’s ideas. Collaboration was especially helpful in scrabble, as two teams of two would compete against each other, and more often than not two teammates would have a larger range of vocabulary than a sole person. This collaboration allowed me to play words I would not have even thought of in scrabble, but my teammate did. Working with others in Eng-1103, was very impactful for me and taught me how to integrate others’ ideas with my own. 

    In class it is required that all students have a blog page on wordpress, where they can post their writing, and view others’. On this blog we practice reading other students’ analysis and craft responses to them in our comments. These blogs let us see other students writing styles, transitions, and syntax, these have helped inspire me to write better. When we are not on our blogs in class, we write on paper only, and no phones are allowed. This act of limiting screen time allows us to take a break from our phones and don’t need to worry about getting distracted, instead we can devote one hundred percent of our focus to our writing. Without the temptation of going on my phone I feel I am able to write much more, and not give up when I run into difficulty, or don’t know what to write next. Through blogs and limited screen time in class I am able to express my thoughts more freely, and focus on the task at hand better 

    For some people Eng-1103 is the easiest course they’ll take, for others it’s a little more challenging. So far, I am like others, I find it usually difficult to write and organize essays, but I feel Eng-1103 has allowed me to write more freely, and stress about organization afterward. In my English class I have learned to expand my vocabulary from scrabble, freely express my thoughts in a blog, and focus better with limited screen time. 

    Works Cited

    Rosenwasser, David and Jill Stephen. “Integrating Quotations.” Writing Analytically, 8th edition. Wadsworth/Cengage, 2019. pp.124-25. 

    Creative Project Revision

    Since I was young I always liked to make up stories. Whether it was playing outside with friends or daydreaming during class, I loved to think of stories. My birthday rarely falls on thanksgiving, and when it does, it’s my favorite day of the year. My whole family gathers at someone’s house and we all eat Thanksgiving dinner together. The year it was on my birthday I decided I wanted to make a story and read it during dinner to my family. In school we used to sing about a turkey named Albuquerque so, it being thanksgiving I decided to write a story about a turkey. The story cover was made out of cardboard from a toilet paper roll and the pages were lined paper ripped out of a notebook. The book fit in my small hands and looked more like a small passport book. The story begins with a girl named Sally and her friends Mary and Laura who are having a sleepover when they hear strange noises from outside. The girls, curious as to what the noise is, decide to look outside, and there in the alleyway by the house they find a Turkey. Sally, wanting to keep her newfound turkey, hides it in her bathtub from her parents. When Sally goes to school she leaves the turkey there and prays her mom doesn’t find it. After school she rushes home and discovers the bathtub is empty and the turkey is nowhere to be found, and it’s the day before thanksgiving! Sally thinks her mom found and killed the turkey, but then her mom reveals that she found and kept the turkey and it is still alive. The story ends with the family enjoying Thanksgiving dinner that year without turkey, and instead keep the turkey as a pet.

    After completing the book I wrote a mini biography and felt like a published author. Naturally, I wanted everyone to read my story so after Thanksgiving break when all the kids went back to school I found my old teacher and told her I have a story I would like to read to her and her class. She said she would love to hear my story and after recess I should come to her classroom to read my book. After recess I grabbed my book from my classroom and ran over to hers, her students were sitting nicely on the floor and she gave me a chair to sit on in the front of the room. I began reading and showing the pictures to the audience of listening students and they all gasped when it came to the part where the turkey was missing. My teacher spoke in a surprised voice “Oh no I hope the turkey doesn’t die”, and I said “Me too, I hope the turkey is alright” carefully to not spoil the story. My old teacher was overjoyed when she learned that the turkey survived and instead became the family pet. She then applauded me and said it was a very good story and the whole class seemed to love it too.

    This experience was so positive for me that when I was young I decided I wanted to write more stories, so whenever we got the chance In class I would make elaborate stories and then share them with my brothers. This allowed me to use my imagination and create something other people can enjoy with it. When I wasn’t writing stories I was telling them to my younger brother. Since we shared a room most of our lives before bed I would tell him stories about a vampire who loved cherries and he would always get happy when I began the story with the recurring character. Stories, whether it be made up or a real-life experience, teach a lesson to the reader/listener sometimes it can stick with you for a day, or sometimes the rest of your life.        

    Online Dating: Under the Surface

    In a world where everything is online, many people have turned to the internet when looking for a significant other. Originally, seen as taboo, dating websites were stigmatized and thought of as ‘strange’ or ‘unnecessary’. Today, 39% of couples have said they met originally online. The stigma of online dating has almost completely disappeared. Why now? Why is online dating so popular and seen as normal? This might have to do with the fact that newer generations are growing up having access to the world’s information just a touch away. With many teens and young adults not knowing a time without the internet, their whole lives they have been turning to it for help. What do many people do when they can’t meet someone “IRL”, they turn to the internet. The destigmatization of these websites and apps lay in our generation’s casual use of technology. As the use of technology has increased, the stigmas around online dating have decreased. Although this seems like a good thing for those who meet online, it also presents problems in itself. These apps can be utilized by anyone, and there’s little to no way to tell if who someone is chatting with is actually who they say they are. Creating the picture perfect profile on tinder allows a user to change how others perceive them, and shows little to nothing about who they are as a person. Despite the prevalence and many advantages of online dating there are many drawbacks that go unacknowledged 

    The idea of finding a partner in a remote location using a ‘profile’ has been around for quite some time. Some records trace the history back to the 1600’s with women and men creating printed ads trying to find a spouse. More specifically according to the online article, “Infographic: A History of Love and Technology”, The first example of a printed personal ad was “Thank Gutenburg!”in 1685. In 1870 the first newspaper directed solely to these ads was created, it was called “The Matrimonial News”. During World War I it was not uncommon to see ads by soldiers asking for someone to write to them, whether it be a friend, or a potential lover, they were called the “lonely soldiers”.These soldiers were seen by many as odd, but many saw them as just lonely, and took them up on their requests to write. During this time and for several years in the future many police and officials thought that these ads could likely be written by prostitutes or homosexuals, they also thought these ads were full of scams and could potentially be dangerous. Although these ads weren’t rare they were definitely stigmatized and if a person had met their significant other from a newspaper ad it typically wasn’t a thing that one would brag about. In the 1940s a matchmaking service was created based on data to find a person their ‘social equivalent’ . In 1965 the first computer dating service was launched; it is called “Tact” and attracts thousands of customers. In 1995, the first online dating website was launched and it was called Match.com. One year later there were 16 similar websites listed as dating sites on the web. In 2002, MySpace was launched and with that came the popularization of online friends, and the possibility of finding boyfriends or girlfriends through online friends. These ideas became more prominent in 2004 with the launch of Facebook. In 2009 a dating app by the name of Grindr entered the app store, 3 years later Tinder was created. These apps helped popularize the ideas of online dating even further by making it a simple swipe if a person was interested. They also helped create a new social norm for the dating world. Today, finding a partner online is easier and more common than ever, but because of the popularity, many people overlook possible dangers and don’t consider if who they’re talking to are really who they say they are.

    Despite these possible dangers, online dating has created a whole new way to meet people and form relationships in a shorter amount of time. Both partners go into the relationship knowing they are looking for the same thing. With the creation of this whole new dating world comes other perks. Many people who are tired of difficult ways to ask the person they think is attractive, can now just swipe right or left if they think someone is attractive and it’s an instant match. Through this swipe right and left culture there is a pool of ‘eligible partners’ to pick from and users can set the limits. A user is able to choose how close they are in location to them, or how close they are in age. The app allows the consumer to be able to narrow down the pool and look for exactly what they want in a potential partner, at least on the surface level. Users are able to find people who they normally wouldn’t even talk to, whether they were too shy or just not interested at first glance. Maybe it’s an aspiring artist, but since the person doesn’t go to any art classes the chances of them meeting an artist on the street are very slim. With creating an online profile, comes pictures of a user that they think they look good in, and good news, others do too. With the rush of compliments that a user can get from others users,  the confidence that the user who posted it will skyrocket after using one of these dating apps. These apps make many users feel good about the validation that they will receive from potential partners and gives them the boost of self-esteem that they may have been lacking while trying to find a partner organically. These apps can turn very insecure people into people who have a newfound confidence after their beauty has been noticed by complete strangers.

    On the surface level, online dating sounds like a wonderful idea to connect people who are in need of romance and love, but if one digs a little deeper one may find some disturbing and unsettling things. The fact of the matter is, a person doesn’t really know who they are chatting with, they could be a normal person, or they could very well be a predator. According to Background Checks.org’s article: “The Most Dangerous States for Online Dating”, 10% of sex offenders use dating sites, and in the past 5 years the number of sexual assaults linked to online dating has grown by six-fold. Another issue that many face when using these online dating platforms is spam users. Spam users are fundamentally accounts created by programs to gain information on people. Typically, these bots will tell a user to click on a link, this link is essentially a virus or some type of credit-card-stealing system. As reported by BackgroundChecks.org, “1 in 10 users on free dating apps are scammers”. While scammers don’t sound as dangerous as a sexual predator, they can do some serious damage. Based on data collected by Fortunly.com, by using sources such as Michigan State University, every year 15 million Americans become victims of Identity theft. Of those Americans, the most common type of Identity theft was having their credit card information stolen. These worrying statistics, help show that the true risk of online dating isn’t what a person says, but who they are saying it to.

    While swiping on an online dating app, a user gets to look at all the potential matches, and the first thing that is noticed is a potential match’s physical attraction levels. While flipping through a profile, usually, the only information given is a few photos, the person’s first name, and their short biography. Using these things, a user judges if this person is worth their time and if they should pursue them. This type of thinking is very shallow and has created a terrible way of how people look at dating. Instead of trying to find the most compatible partner a user is now trying to find the most attractive one. This sort of thinking brings many problems and can make the user feel as if ‘unattractive’ people aren’t worth the time of day. This creates the notion that only ‘attractive’ people have worth and deserve to be talked to. Not only do users do this, but they also experience this, many females are messaged only because of their bodies. According to research from Pewresearch.org’s article, “10 Facts about Americans and Online Dating”, 30% of female online dating users that they surveyed, said that they received “too many messages” on these platforms. While it might feel good to get that little confidence boost that comes with an attractive person deeming another user attractive, there is another user that is being discriminating against based on their physcial appearance. 

    When it comes to biographies, many people see it as another opportunity to reel the person in, if they weren’t shallow enough to just look at the pictures, so when trying to get a match they sometimes twist the truth, or just outright lie. Based on research from University of Wisconsin alumni, “The Truth about Online Dating Liars” , about 80% of people lied about their age, weight or height. This may seem like an objectively small lie, but to start the relationship with a lie is very deceiving, and when the partner finds out they will most likely be angry. It doesn’t matter if the lie is petite, the principle of lying is enough to create a wilt in a blossoming relationship. People often show others what they want them to see, nobody is going to show themselves in a bad light especially when they are trying to find a partner.  

      Regardless of the popularity that online dating has in today’s society, there are hidden dangers that many people overlook. It is hard to tell if the person on the other side of the screen is an actual person. With the rise of dating apps also came the rise of online scammers and identity stealers. If the person isn’t a scammer it doesn’t automatically mean they’re good, many deranged people use dating apps as a facet to find unsuspecting victims to prey on. Given the long history of online dating it is hard to say that the idea is inherently bad, or even that it is good. For the most part the program is neutral, and depending on the user it can be used for great reasons, or be twisted into something sinister. The reality is, that the newer generations who were born with technology will become very accustomed and comfortable to using these applications to find love online, and all users should know the risks that come when they sign up to be a part of these websites. 

    WORKS CITED 

    DateAha! (2019, January 14). Pants on fire: The most common lies on dating sites (and why people lie). Medium. Retrieved April 25, 2022, from https://medium.com/@dateaha/https-medium-com-dateaha-pants-on-fire-most-common-lies-dating-sites-why-people-lie-76c4329ea0b9 

    Whipps, H. (2009, March 9). The 300-year history of internet dating. LiveScience. Retrieved April 25, 2022, from https://www.livescience.com/3362-300-year-history-internet-dating.html 

    History of online dating. Brainz. (n.d.). Retrieved April 25, 2022, from https://www.brainz.org/history-online-dating/ 

    The Truth About Online Dating Liars. Wisconsin Alumni Association. (n.d.). Retrieved April 25, 2022, from https://www.uwalumni.com/news/online-dating-research/ 

    The most dangerous states for online dating. Background Checks.org. (n.d.). Retrieved April 25, 2022, from https://backgroundchecks.org/the-most-dangerous-states-for-online-dating.html 

    Vogels, E. A. (2020, June 4). 10 facts about Americans and online dating. Pew Research Center. Retrieved April 25, 2022, from https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2020/02/06/10-facts-about-americans-and-online-dating/ 

    Advertisement
  • Final Class Reflection

    While taking the course Eng 1103, I have learned more about how to write for an audience and have expanded my vocabulary, in addition to learning how to limit my screen time. This course using Dr.Lucas’ unique teaching style has taught me several things that have greatly improved my writing. Writing an online blog on wordpress has helped me write for an audience. Having a clear audience in mind, I felt I was able to better connect with my readers and give more detailed pieces and have more specific examples when writing my articles. I also tried to let the readers know a little about my and my hobbies when we wrote our first piece. Knowing that my writing would be read by someone also helped my quality of writing improve overall. When it comes to expanding my vocabulary wordplay day helped with that. On Wordplay day, every friday, we would play scrabble and compete against each other with teams of two. Collaborating with my teammate helped us both learn new words and win the game. In class we are usually not allowed to use our computers unless we are typing up our essay revisions, or reading and responding to other classmate’s blogs on wordpress. Except for a five minute break we are not allowed to use our phones during class. This helps limit distractions and I find myself not worried about snapchat or instagram notifications, and I can devote all my attention into my writing, and the current task at hand in class. This has helped impact me even when I am not in Dr. Lucas’ class. I am now able to write essays without having to play music in one ear and can now devote all of my attention to doing my homework with zero distractions. Writing for a blog, wordplay day, and limiting screen time have all helped to improve my English and writing skills.

    Another thing we used in class was the textbook, Writing Analytically by David Rosenwasser and Jill Stephen. This resource was very useful because it gave extremely helpful information and tips when writing papers, such as how to integrate quotes, weak thesis statements, and writing on paper vs computers. While reading this textbook, I was able to learn how to identify a weak thesis statement, as well as how to fix it. This skill of being able to identify a weak thesis statement helped me tremendously with the impact and strength of my writing. I am now able to create a thesis statement that accurately captures the meaning of my paper and delivers my main idea. In order to have a strong thesis statement one of the most basic tips is that you should have a strong claim. According to Writing Analytically , if there is no claim, “There is, in short, nothing at stake, no issue to be resolved.”. If there is no claim then “they direct neither the writer nor the reader toward some position or organizational plan.” Reading this textbook has taught me how to write the best thesis statement possible for my essays.

    Work Cited

    Rosenwasser, David and Jill Stephen. “Five Kinds of Weak Thesis Statements.” Writing Analytically, 8th edition. Wadsworth/ Cengage, 2019. Pp.208-12.

  • Online Dating: Under The Surface

    Online Dating: Under the Surface

    In a world where everything is online, many people have turned to the internet when looking for a significant other. Originally, seen as taboo, dating websites were stigmatized and thought of as ‘strange’ or ‘unnecessary’. Today, 39% of couples have said they met originally online. The stigma of online dating has almost completely disappeared. Why now? Why is online dating so popular and seen as normal? This might have to do with the fact that newer generations are growing up having access to the world’s information just a touch away. With many teens and young adults not knowing a time without the internet, their whole lives they have been turning to it for help. What do many people do when they can’t meet someone “IRL”, they turn to the internet. The destigmatization of these websites and apps lay in our generation’s casual use of technology. As the use of technology has increased, the stigmas around online dating have decreased. Although this seems like a good thing for those who meet online, it also presents problems in itself. These apps can be utilized by anyone, and there’s little to no way to tell if who someone is chatting with is actually who they say they are. Creating the picture perfect profile on tinder allows a user to change how others perceive them, and shows little to nothing about who they are as a person. Despite the prevalence and many advantages of online dating there are many drawbacks that go unacknowledged 

    The idea of finding a partner in a remote location using a ‘profile’ has been around for quite some time. Some records trace the history back to the 1600’s with women and men creating printed ads trying to find a spouse. More specifically according to the online article, “Infographic: A History of Love and Technology”, The first example of a printed personal ad was “Thank Gutenburg!”in 1685. In 1870 the first newspaper directed solely to these ads was created, it was called “The Matrimonial News”. During World War I it was not uncommon to see ads by soldiers asking for someone to write to them, whether it be a friend, or a potential lover, they were called the “lonely soldiers”.These soldiers were seen by many as odd, but many saw them as just lonely, and took them up on their requests to write. During this time and for several years in the future many police and officials thought that these ads could likely be written by prostitutes or homosexuals, they also thought these ads were full of scams and could potentially be dangerous. Although these ads weren’t rare they were definitely stigmatized and if a person had met their significant other from a newspaper ad it typically wasn’t a thing that one would brag about. In the 1940s a matchmaking service was created based on data to find a person their ‘social equivalent’ . In 1965 the first computer dating service was launched; it is called “Tact” and attracts thousands of customers. In 1995, the first online dating website was launched and it was called Match.com. One year later there were 16 similar websites listed as dating sites on the web. In 2002, MySpace was launched and with that came the popularization of online friends, and the possibility of finding boyfriends or girlfriends through online friends. These ideas became more prominent in 2004 with the launch of Facebook. In 2009 a dating app by the name of Grindr entered the app store, 3 years later Tinder was created. These apps helped popularize the ideas of online dating even further by making it a simple swipe if a person was interested. They also helped create a new social norm for the dating world. Today, finding a partner online is easier and more common than ever, but because of the popularity, many people overlook possible dangers and don’t consider if who they’re talking to are really who they say they are.

    Despite these possible dangers, online dating has created a whole new way to meet people and form relationships in a shorter amount of time. Both partners go into the relationship knowing they are looking for the same thing. With the creation of this whole new dating world comes other perks. Many people who are tired of difficult ways to ask the person they think is attractive, can now just swipe right or left if they think someone is attractive and it’s an instant match. Through this swipe right and left culture there is a pool of ‘eligible partners’ to pick from and users can set the limits. A user is able to choose how close they are in location to them, or how close they are in age. The app allows the consumer to be able to narrow down the pool and look for exactly what they want in a potential partner, at least on the surface level.Users are able to find people who they normally wouldn’t even talk to, whether they were too shy or just not interested at first glance. Maybe it’s an aspiring artist, but since the person doesn’t go to any art classes the chances of them meeting an artist on the street are very slim. With creating an online profile, comes pictures of a user that they think they  look good in, and good news, others do too. With the rush of compliments that a user can get from others users,  the confidence that the user who posted it will skyrocket after using one of these dating apps. These apps make many users feel good about the validation that they will receive from potential partners and gives them the boost of self-esteem that they may have been lacking while trying to find a partner organically. These apps can turn very insecure people into people who have a newfound confidence after their beauty has been noticed by complete strangers.

    On the surface level, online dating sounds like a wonderful idea to connect people who are in need of romance and love, but if one digs a little deeper one may find some disturbing and unsettling things. The fact of the matter is, a person doesn’t really know who they are chatting with,  they could be a normal person, or they could very well be a predator. According to Background Checks.org’s article: “The Most Dangerous States for Online Dating”, 10% of sex offenders use dating sites, and in the past 5 years the number of sexual assaults linked to online dating has grown by six-fold. Another issue that many face when using these online dating platforms is spam users. Spam users are fundamentally accounts created by programs to gain information on people. Typically, these bots will tell a user to click on a link, this link is essentially a virus or some type of credit-card-stealing system. As reported by BackgroundChecks.org, “1 in 10 users on free dating apps are scammers”. While scammers don’t sound as dangerous as a sexual predator, they can do some serious damage. Based on data collected by Fortunly.com, by using sources such as Michigan State University, every year 15 million Americans become victims of Identity theft. Of those Americans, the most common type of Identity theft was having their credit card information stolen. These worrying statistics, help show that the true risk of online dating isn’t what a person says, but who they are saying it to.

    While swiping on an online dating app, a user gets to look at all the potential matches, and the first thing that is noticed is a potential match’s physical attraction levels. While flipping through a profile, usually, the only information given is a few photos, the person’s first name, and their short biography. Using these things, a user judges if this person is worth their time and if they should pursue them. This type of thinking is very shallow and has created a terrible way of how people look at dating. Instead of trying to find the most compatible partner a user is now trying to find the most attractive one. This sort of thinking brings many problems and can make the user feel as if ‘unattractive’ people aren’t worth the time of day. This creates the notion that only ‘attractive’ people have worth and deserve to be talked to. Not only do users do this, but they also experience this, many females are messaged only because of their bodies. According to research from Pewresearch.org’s article, “10 Facts about Americans and Online Dating”, 30% of female online dating users that they surveyed, said that they received “too many messages” on these platforms. While it might feel good to get that little confidence boost that comes with an attractive person deeming another user attractive, there is another user that is being discriminating against based on their physcial appearance. 

    When it comes to biographies, many people see it as another opportunity to reel the person in, if they weren’t shallow enough to just look at the pictures, so when trying to get a match they sometimes twist the truth, or just outright lie. Based on research from University of Wisconsin alumni, “The Truth about Online Dating Liars” , about 80% of people lied about their age, weight or height. This may seem like an objectively small lie, but to start the relationship with a lie is very deceiving, and when the partner finds out they will most likely be angry. It doesn’t matter if the lie is petite, the principle of lying is enough to create a wilt in a blossoming relationship. People often show others what they want them to see, nobody is going to show themselves in a bad light especially when they are trying to find a partner.  

      Regardless of the popularity that online dating has in today’s society, there are hidden dangers that many people overlook. It is hard to tell if the person on the other side of the screen is an actual person. With the rise of dating apps also came the rise of online scammers and identity stealers. If the person isn’t a scammer it doesn’t automatically mean they’re good, many deranged people use dating apps as a facet to find unsuspecting victims to prey on. Given the long history of online dating it is hard to say that the idea is inherently bad, or even that it is good. For the most part the program is neutral, and depending on the user it can be used for great reasons, or be twisted into something sinister. The reality is, that the newer generations who were born with technology will become very accustomed and comfortable to using these applications to find love online, and all users should know the risks that come when they sign up to be a part of these websites. 

    WORKS CITED 

    DateAha! (2019, January 14). Pants on fire: The most common lies on dating sites (and why people lie). Medium. Retrieved April 25, 2022, from https://medium.com/@dateaha/https-medium-com-dateaha-pants-on-fire-most-common-lies-dating-sites-why-people-lie-76c4329ea0b9 

    Whipps, H. (2009, March 9). The 300-year history of internet dating. LiveScience. Retrieved April 25, 2022, from https://www.livescience.com/3362-300-year-history-internet-dating.html 

    History of online dating. Brainz. (n.d.). Retrieved April 25, 2022, from https://www.brainz.org/history-online-dating/ 

    The Truth About Online Dating Liars. Wisconsin Alumni Association. (n.d.). Retrieved April 25, 2022, from https://www.uwalumni.com/news/online-dating-research/ 

    The most dangerous states for online dating. Background Checks.org. (n.d.). Retrieved April 25, 2022, from https://backgroundchecks.org/the-most-dangerous-states-for-online-dating.html 

    Vogels, E. A. (2020, June 4). 10 facts about Americans and online dating. Pew Research Center. Retrieved April 25, 2022, from https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2020/02/06/10-facts-about-americans-and-online-dating/ 

  • Creative Project Revision

    Since I was young I always liked to make up stories. Whether it was playing outside with friends or daydreaming during class, I loved to think of stories. My birthday rarely falls on thanksgiving, and when it does, it’s my favorite day of the year. My whole family gathers at someone’s house and we all eat Thanksgiving dinner together. The year it was on my birthday I decided I wanted to make a story and read it during dinner to my family. In school we used to sing about a turkey named Albuquerque so, it being thanksgiving I decided to write a story about a turkey. The story cover was made out of cardboard from a toilet paper roll and the pages were lined paper ripped out of a notebook. The book fit in my small hands and looked more like a small passport book. The story begins with a girl named Sally and her friends Mary and Laura who are having a sleepover when they hear strange noises from outside. The girls, curious as to what the noise is, decide to look outside, and there in the alleyway by the house they find a Turkey. Sally, wanting to keep her newfound turkey, hides it in her bathtub from her parents. When Sally goes to school she leaves the turkey there and prays her mom doesn’t find it. After school she rushes home and discovers the bathtub is empty and the turkey is nowhere to be found, and it’s the day before thanksgiving! Sally thinks her mom found and killed the turkey, but then her mom reveals that she found and kept the turkey and it is still alive. The story ends with the family enjoying Thanksgiving dinner that year without turkey, and instead keep the turkey as a pet.

    After completing the book I wrote a mini biography and felt like a published author. Naturally, I wanted everyone to read my story so after Thanksgiving break when all the kids went back to school I found my old teacher and told her I have a story I would like to read to her and her class. She said she would love to hear my story and after recess I should come to her classroom to read my book. After recess I grabbed my book from my classroom and ran over to hers, her students were sitting nicely on the floor and she gave me a chair to sit on in the front of the room. I began reading and showing the pictures to the audience of listening students and they all gasped when it came to the part where the turkey was missing. My teacher spoke in a surprised voice “Oh no I hope the turkey doesn’t die”, and I said “Me too, I hope the turkey is alright” carefully to not spoil the story. My old teacher was overjoyed when she learned that the turkey survived and instead became the family pet. She then applauded me and said it was a very good story and the whole class seemed to love it too.

    This experience was so positive for me that when I was young I decided I wanted to write more stories, so whenever we got the chance In class I would make elaborate stories and then share them with my brothers. This allowed me to use my imagination and create something other people can enjoy with it. When I wasn’t writing stories I was telling them to my younger brother. Since we shared a room most of our lives before bed I would tell him stories about a vampire who loved cherries and he would always get happy when I began the story with the recurring character. Stories, whether it be made up or a real-life experience, teach a lesson to the reader/listener sometimes it can stick with you for a day, or sometimes the rest of your life.        

  • Midterm Reflection

    ENG-1103, A Required Course 

    Eng-1103, a required class for all students at High Point University, provides students with a foundation of the fundamentals of college English courses. Many take it solely because they have to, others take it for enjoyment, and their love of writing. Either Way, both types of students can be found in the classroom, and it’s up to the professor to create their experience. In my English Class we are able to play scrabble, craft blogs, and limit our screen time, all allowing us to focus better in class, have fun, and learn new words. These experiences, in addition to my analysis paper, have taught me that writing doesn’t have to be terrible and can be enjoyable. 

    In class to help expand and develop our writing skill we use Writing Analytically, a textbook by David Rosenwasser and Jill Stephen. One thing these lessons from Writing Analytically has taught me was in order to include more information in a quotation you can add square brackets for context. An example I can take from the book is “use square brackets to alter or add information within a quotation” (Stephen, Rosenwasser 233) and I can alter it to give more information by saying, “use square brackets [in your quotations] to alter or add information within a quotation.”. My incerpt gave the reader more direction to use for the tip. This trick from the textbook helped me when writing my analytical essay. I was able to give more insight and context to my readers. I was able to learn new tricks in class by using the textbook to help write my analytical essay.  

    The next activity in class we did that I would like to talk about is playing scrabble. To most people playing scrabble during class sounds “too fun” for class or “too easy” but while they were enjoyable, they weren’t always easy. One time I was down to only consonants and was ready to accept defeat, when my professor came over and told me to play an m, which gave me three words, mic, bi, and om, which gave me twenty-six points in one turn. I never would have thought of those words on my own, but I will be using them in future games. Though scrabble seems like some childish game, you can learn a lot of new words, and about the limits of your vocabulary.  

    An additional aspect about Eng-1103 that I enjoyed was the collaboration in almost everything. Classwork was usually done in groups of four, where each member of the group had to give their feedback on the topic. This classwork was usually a small writing prompt where we would read and give our thoughts, we would then work together to combine our thoughts into one main idea. This not only helped everyone participate but it taught us how we should work with others by using everyone’s ideas. Collaboration was especially helpful in scrabble, as two teams of two would compete against each other, and more often than not two teammates would have a larger range of vocabulary than a sole person. This collaboration allowed me to play words I would not have even thought of in scrabble, but my teammate did. Working with others in Eng-1103, was very impactful for me and taught me how to integrate others’ ideas with my own.  

    In class it is required that all students have a blog page on WordPress, where they can post their writing, and view others’. On this blog we practice reading other students’ analysis and craft responses to them in our comments. These blogs let us see other students writing styles, transitions, and syntax, these have helped inspire me to write better. When we are not on our blogs in class, we write on paper only, and no phones are allowed. This act of limiting screen time allows us to take a break from our phones and don’t need to worry about getting distracted, instead we can devote one hundred percent of our focus to our writing. Without the temptation of going on my phone I feel I am able to write much more, and not give up when I run into difficulty, or don’t know what to write next. Through blogs and limited screen time in class I am able to express my thoughts more freely, and focus on the task at hand better  

    For some people Eng-1103 is the easiest course they’ll take, for others it’s a little more challenging. So far, I am like others, I find it usually difficult to write and organize essays, but I feel Eng-1103 has allowed me to write more freely, and stress about organization afterward. In my English class I have learned to expand my vocabulary from scrabble, freely express my thoughts in a blog, and focus better with limited screen time.  

    Works Cited 

    Rosenwasser, David and Jill Stephen. “Integrating Quotations.” Writing Analytically, 8th edition. Wadsworth/Cengage, 2019. pp.124-25.  

  • Old Literacy In The New World

    Old Literacy in the New World

    Matt Richtel, writer of the New York Times article “Blogs vs.Term Papers” discusses the debate in the educational world of mid-term papers or blogs. The article begins by stating how stressful writing an academic paper can be for students. Richtel then introduces Cathy N.Davidson, an english professor at Duke, who believes in the positive power of blogs and “new literacy.” Shortly after this Richtel introduces Douglas B.Reeves, Founder of the Leadership and Learning center and a columnist for the American School Board Journal, Reeves believes in the beneficial influence of term papers. Richtel then quotes two more people and their views; William H.Fitzhugh, the study’s author and founder of The Concord Review, lists his view of the issue and a possible solution for this, in addition to Fitzhugh, Andrea A.Lunsford, a professor of English at Stanford then states her point of view that there is no problem to be solved. Richtel closes out the paper with a quote from Professor Davidson that seems to be pro-blog and anti- term paper. Throughout the article Richtel places emphasis on the positives to the new form of literacy and through his increased information and quotations based on this type of literacy, a bias is created against the term paper, and older forms of literacy. 

    “Old literacy”, such as, writing term papers is described to give the writer a “dramatic leg up in the terms of critical thinking, argumentation and the sort of expression required. Not only in college, but in the job market” (Reeves qtd in Richtel) “Blogs vs. Term Papers’ ‘. After Richtel quotes Reeves he then gives the statistic that 82% of first year college students were not asked to write a paper of 20 pages or more, this statistic, which comes from The National Survey of Student Engagement in 2011, reveals the decreasing popularity of the term paper. This statistic is Richtel’s way of saying that it is becoming increasingly uncommon to see students with these ‘critical thinking skills’. Richtel’s quotes reinforces the position of pro-term papers, but also addresses the decreasing popularity of the term paper and the increasing popularity of the blog. Richtel uses quotations to give a solution- Mr.Fitzhugh claims that “the solution [to the decrease in writing of term papers] isn’t blogs, the solution is more reading”. This quote proposes that the problem lies within the school systems and the teachers themselves.

    Writing outline

    “New Literacy” which can be classified as PowerPoints, blogs, tweets or anything on the internet someone can write. “New Literacy” is what the most recent generations have been raised on. This means that these students are more comfortable writing a blog post or an instagram caption than a research paper. This idea is supported when Richtel mentions that Professor Lunsford believes “students feel much more impassioned by the new literacy”. On these websites and apps instant gratification can be found through the number of likes or comments on the media, which generally encourages the person to post again. Richtel then continues to voice Lunsford’s opinions when he includes that, “They [students] love writing for an audience, engaging with it…..producing something personally rewarding and valuable”. Davidson also believes that this ‘new-age’ form of writing grows passion for literature, and without it many students think that“writing is boring”. 

    Rough Draft

    Richtel shows his bias towards this new type of writing when he claims that “Professor Lunsford is playing to student passions”. Richtel brings up the phrase “student passions” to tell the audience that blogs are what the students prefer and what they can be passionate about. Richtel argues that students cannot be passionate about a 15 page research paper but can instead take interest and pride in blogs. 

    The utilization of many sources that have similar views on the term-paper shows Richtel’s bias. Richtel uses one source to take the side that term-papers are more beneficial then seems to not quote them for the remainder of the article. On the other hand, Richtel uses three sources supporting the blog as a tool for students. Richtel shows his bias in his article without even outright saying it just based on the amount of quotes he has that favors blogs throughout his writing.

    Ten years after Richtel’s article was published we can see that this is still a debate in the academic world, but we can also see which side seems to be winning. Surprisingly it seems to be a mixture of both, although the assignment of many long papers have ceased to exist, term-papers still do exist but seem to be more smaller-feasible papers. We have also seen the increase in the amount of blogs being made and assigned to students, in fact many students have had an experience of a project that related to writing on a form of social media. 

    Work Cited

    Richtel, Matt. “Blogs vs. Term Papers,” The New York Times, 20 Jan. 2012, https://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/22/education/edlife/muscling-in-on-the-term-paper-tradition.html.

  • Je m’appelle Kat

    National French Honor Society Logo

    I began taking French in 6th grade. That was also the first time I got a C. French frustrated me I couldn’t understand why we didn’t pronounce almost half of the word. After this terrible grade I started going to after school extra help, determined to at least get a B in this class. The end of the semester I was overjoyed with my B+, but I found myself upset that the class was over. At the end of my 6th grade year we moved away, and my new school no longer offered French. Then in 9th grade my high school offered French. I decided to take it and after that I took it all four years. My senior year I was inducted into the French Honor Society and saw how far I’ve come since my first French class. Now, as a first year in college, I am minoring in French and am in a conversations class.